music

Bob Dylan and Echo Helstrom

By on
a young Echo Helstrom

Echo and Pan: The Girl on the Swing

“One thing that always surprised me was that Bobby ever had anything to do with me, because I was from the other side of the tracks. He was a nice Hibbing boy and I was from out of town. He was rich folk and we were poor folk. He was Jewish and we were German, Swedish, Russian, and Irish, all mixed together.”

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Restless to Leave Hibbing

By on
 Bob Dylan drive and house in Hibbing

Don Quixote and Sancho Panza

At 16, Bob used to tell John Bucklen, “You are my main man”—high praise in 1950s patois. Bucklen’s family was working-class, mainstream American, probably of English descent. John also had that sense of being “bad, man, bad.” Even with those nice, middle-class boys from the Twin Cities whom Bob met at the Theodor Herzl summer camp near Webster, Wisconsin, he could find some “bad” guys to befriend.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Teenage Acting and Motorbike Interest

By on
 Bob Dylan's first motor cycle Harley 45 in 1956

Actors’ Studio Midwest

Before Elvis donned black leather, the idols of many young Americans had nothing to do with music. A few idolized the genial general who moved into the White House in 1953 but a small circle of Iron Range youths found their models in the Actors’ Studio, by way of the movies. Brando’s The Wild One and Dean’s East of Eden, Giant, and, especially, Rebel Without a Cause stunned these isolated provincials.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan First Bands as Teenager

By on
Robert Zimmerman (Bob Dylan) on stage with the Golden Chords

Bob Dylan's Early Bands as a Child

In 1968, Le Roy Hoikkala, a sky, slight electronics technician, told Rober Shelton: “I met Bob downtown one day and we got to talking about music. We were in eighth grade, and I was very much involved in playing drums. Monte Edwardson was guitar player, and the three of us got together, around 1955, in Bob’s garage for some sessions.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Music as a Child

By on
Herzl camp 1957 Robert Zimmerman aka Bob Dylan, music as a child

Bob Dylan's music making as a child.

Strings of Freedom.

Although Bob Dylan's father Abe, never called himself a great music-lover, music was important to him. He trooped Beatty (Dylan's mother) off to a lodge dance at the drop of an invitation. A Gulbransen spinet piano arrived at much the same time as the television, and was set in the front room for all to admire. Abe couldn’t read a note, but he loved to fake a few chords.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Bar Mitzvah and Jewish Tradition

By on
Bob Dylan Jewish Background

Words and Music—Traditional

The emotional tethers of Judaism are as long and strong as the umbilicus. First- and second-generation offspring of Jewish immigrants found many powerful reasons for assimilating into the American grain. In the New World, the biblical-cum-medieval Jewish traditions had no apparent appeals and many obvious drawbacks.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Poetry as a Child

By on
 Bob Dylan poem as child for mother on Mother's Day

The Poet Before the Electric Age

Bob Dylan's poems for his parents (see below).

Bob Dylan's father, Abe Zimmerman, was a short man with an appealing smile that revealed irregular teeth. Behind his strong glasses, his eyes were a soft boyish blue, until they hardened. His wavy black hair was flecked with gray. He dressed in sport shirts, slacks, and sweaters that suggested California more than Minnesota. He frequently sported a fine, thick cigar. Abe’s speech was slow and deliberate, in contrast to Beatty’s (Bob Dylan's mother) torrential flow.

Tags: 

Bob Dylan's Birth

By on
Bob Dylan get born

Bob Dylan was born on May 24th 1941 in St Mary's Hospital, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Although it may not have been widely noted at the time in Duluth, the literary world of 1941 mourned three of its giants. James Joyce died in Switzerland. F Scott Fitzgerald and Sherwood Anderson, two of the writers whom critic Maxwell Geismar later numbered among “the last of the provincials,” also died early in the year.

Meanwhile, Bob Dylan's mother, Beatty had a news bulletin of literary and musical significance. “Abe,” she exclaimed. “Abe, I feel it! I think the baby is coming.”

Tags: 

Bob Dylan Introduction

By on
bob dylan with electric guitar

No other figure from the world of American popular music, of this or any other era, has attracted the volume of critical attention, much of it quite original and perceptive, that Bob Dylan has. Just as significantly, no popular culture figure has ever been adopted into the curricula of college and university language and literature departments in the way Dylan has; critics have called James Joyce “God’s gift to English departments,” but Dylan is no less deserving of that designation.

Tags: 

Pages